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Meanwhile in Sudan

Posted on Friday 20 July with 24 notes.
Sudanese Ramadan drinks, photo by Yassir HamDi PhotoGraphy 

Sudanese Ramadan drinks, photo by Yassir HamDi PhotoGraphy 

Posted on Thursday 19 July with 5 notes.
Sudanese hospitality

Sudanese hospitality

"Eid Al-Adha feast, Sudanese style"

"Eid Al-Adha feast, Sudanese style"

Posted on Friday 12 August with 8 notes.
Tea with Milk (Shai bey laban/haleeb) is popular in Sudan and many other Middle Eastern countries

Tea with Milk (Shai bey laban/haleeb) is popular in Sudan and many other Middle Eastern countries

Posted on Sunday 7 August with 19 notes.
Avocado and Bravado: Recipes to Try this Ramadan!

Blogger and cooking enthusiast, Rose, writes enlightening descriptions of various international recipes, including a few that are popular in many Sudanese households!

Posted on Sunday 7 August with 24 notes.
“Sudanese coffee is one of the best I’ve ever tasted!”- Photographer Ana Isabel

Sudanese coffee is one of the best I’ve ever tasted!”- Photographer Ana Isabel

Posted on Sunday 7 August with 5 notes.
The International Breakfast Project: Fool Medamas, Sudanese Style

Fool Medamas

  • 1 (16 oz) can of fava beans
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1½ tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley,
  • 4 tbsp lemon juice
  • salt, pepper, and chili powder to taste
  • pita bread
  1. Pour fava beans and juice into a sauce pan and bring them to a boil.
  2. Mix all other ingredients—except lemon juice—in a bowl.
  3. When the bean juice has almost evaporated add the remaining ingredients to the pot along with the lemon juice.
  4. Cook uncovered for about 5 minutes, until most of the water is gone but the mixture is not dry.
  5. Eat with pita bread along with hard boiled eggs and tahini." -Recipe from The International Breakfast Project

Posted on Sunday 7 August with 4 notes.
Popular in Sudan and several other Middle Eastern nations, Qamar el-Deen is an apricot drink that many families enjoy in Ramadan. Qamar el-deen literally translates to “moon of the religion” and it is made using apricot leather, which is sold in many Middle Eastern Stores. 
To make the drink, Blogger Rose includes the following recipe:
“Qamar el-Deen Drink (Apricot Drink)
 
Print this recipe
1 pack apricot leather (17.6 oz, or 500g)8 c water1/3 c sugar1 T orange blossom water (optional)
Cut the apricot leather into pieces and place them in a large bowl. Add sugar to the bowl.
Boil 3 cups of water and pour the water over the apricots and stir. Cover for a few hours or overnight, stirring occasionally.
Transfer the apricot mixture to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture to a large stockpot and add the five remaining cups of water. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil and stir in orange blossom water, if using.
Strain the mixture through a sieve and refrigerate until cold. Serve over ice.
Serves 8" 

Popular in Sudan and several other Middle Eastern nations, Qamar el-Deen is an apricot drink that many families enjoy in Ramadan. Qamar el-deen literally translates to “moon of the religion” and it is made using apricot leather, which is sold in many Middle Eastern Stores. 

To make the drink, Blogger Rose includes the following recipe:

Qamar el-Deen Drink (Apricot Drink)

Print this recipe

1 pack apricot leather (17.6 oz, or 500g)
8 c water
1/3 c sugar
1 T orange blossom water (optional)

Cut the apricot leather into pieces and place them in a large bowl. Add sugar to the bowl.

Boil 3 cups of water and pour the water over the apricots and stir. Cover for a few hours or overnight, stirring occasionally.

Transfer the apricot mixture to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture to a large stockpot and add the five remaining cups of water. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil and stir in orange blossom water, if using.

Strain the mixture through a sieve and refrigerate until cold. Serve over ice.

Serves 8

Posted on Monday 1 August with 30 notes.
The Gourmet Worrier: The Greek Say "Loukoumades" and the Sudanese Say "Ligeemat"

Sudanese cuisine has historically been influenced by many Middle Eastern and Mediterranean neighbors. Many of these cultures have developed their own variations of fried dough recipes. Just as “Loukoumades”  are popular in Greek cultures, “Ligeemat” are popular in Sudanese cultures. In Sudanese households, they are often enjoyed with some tea. The Gourmet Worrier writes about a recipe similar to the Sudanese one, but she suggests that you enjoy her variation with some ice cream! 

Ingredients


2 cups of organic self-raising flour

2 cups of water

2 tbsp of caster sugar

A pinch of salt

Grape seed or sunflower oil, for deep-frying

Cinnamon sugar, to finish

loukoumades10.jpg

Method

1. Put the flour, sugar, salt and water in a large bowl and whisk until you have a smooth batter. 

2. Heat enough oil in a saucepan for deep frying and then take teaspoonfuls of the batter and gently push them into the hot oil with the other teaspoon. Fry for a minute or two or until they are puffed up and are a light golden colour. Drain on kitchen paper and transfer to a serving bowl. 

3. Toss the warm loukoumades in copious amounts of cinnamon sugar or alternatively douse them in warm honey infused with cinnamon. Serve them warm with some homemade milk, honey and cinnamon ice cream (For Ice Cream Recipe, click here!).

-Recipe by the Gourmet Worrier